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William Duncan (wjduncan29@yahoo.com)

William's profile summary

Age:34 new to the area: 3/15/2010 been fly fishing for 3 1/2 years can't get enough of it Fish 50+ times per year
State: New Hampshire.
City: Hancock
                   

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William's descriptions

Andy Idema (aidema) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
B. T. (sockeyebob) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
jack king (jmking) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
Mark Hoekstra (hoeky) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
Paul Eberhart (coldwater) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
Andrew Sears (eastwalkerguide) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
Tray Shields (Shieeds) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
Tom Hoekstra (thoekstra23) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
Chris Miller (thumperboy) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
Judy McCann (jmccann113) wrote a description for the Ellis River, New Hampshire
The Ellis River is a 16.7 mile long (26.9 km)[1] river in the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the United States. It is a tributary of the Saco River, which flows to the Atlantic Ocean in Maine. The Ellis River rises on the eastern slopes of Mount Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States. Flowing south, it is quickly joined by the Cutler River flowing out of Tuckerman and Huntington ravines, passes over Crystal Cascade, and reaches the floor of Pinkham Notch. The river leaves the level ground at the high point of the notch by dropping 64 feet (20 m) over Glen Ellis Falls. The falls are a short walk from Route 16, the highway through the notch. A U.S. Forest Service parking area, not far from the top of the falls, gives access to a well-maintained, hard-surfaced, short trail hugging the river to a point at the top of the falls, where there is a lookout nearly straight down into the gorge, and then the trail proceeds by a steep descent of stairs to the deep pool at the base of the falls. The river continues south into the town of Jackson, New Hampshire, through a gradually widening valley. Leaving the small intervale at Jackson village, the Ellis River drops over a hydroelectric dam at Goodrich Falls and reaches the Saco River near the village of Glen in the town of Bartlett. (07/11/10)
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New Bedford , Pennsylvania
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